Digital Resources

These days I usually link to images on acsearch.info, because of superior quality of these photographs and specimens.  It also highlights the extent to which academic numismatists remain reliant on the data and material brought to light by dealers in antiquities, a fraught issue to say the least.

I also am trying to provide more links to CRRO (Coinage of the Roman Republic Online) for the types I discuss.

The majority of the early  images on this blog come from the American Numismatic Society Database.

Other major collections on line include the British Museum and Berlin. To search by RRC number in the BM catalog enter the number alone followed by a period and an asterisk, e.g. 381.* or 381.1.*.   The BM has a very handy list of all the Republican moneyers.

Andrew McCabe has gifted the world an extraordinary set of images on his Flickr stream and his website is rich with information and resources.

For the period 168 to 27 BC Warwick University has a new user-friendly educational database.

There is also Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, but the images are often poor and you cannot link to a specific object.

For medals, the place to start is Dick Johnson’s Medal Artists website.  The collection of the Teylers Museum is exceptionally well illustrated.  More resources for finding image of medal are available via the links on this page created by Benjamin Weiss.

I’ve previously blogged about Roman Republican Coin Hoards going online, and Saskia Roselaar‘s map of Roman Republican Coin Finds reveals fascinating connections and patterns.

For ancient art, there is Arachne and also the Beazley Archive.  Few pictures are available, but IconicLIMC is still worth a try as well, even if just to identify what might be relevant to track down by other means.  I’m now finding also that the ‘search the collections’ feature at many of the major collections have now become real potential research tools.  [A few years ago they seemed more like access gimmicks, than truly scholarly databases.]   So here are the links to the Met, the British Museum, the Boston MFA, and the Getty.  The British Museum is especially useful because of their lamp collection.

A list of French online collections is provided here with links.  Perhaps the most useful of these is Joconde system.

Danish museum collections can be searched, but you need to translate your keywords into Danish first!

Other major national collections are coming online, cf. Bologna and Hermitage.

Images in available to be published free of copyright issues may be found through both the Yale University Collection and Thorvaldsens Museum.  The latter is particularly strong on intaglios.

Less scholarly, but still very useful for finding high quality images for personal reference is this Russian database.

For a fairly complete record of free resources, see AWOL.

As to Scholarly Bibliography, a free alternative to L’Année Philologique is GNOMON. Click the union jack in the upper right hand corner to use the English interface. In fact it does a better job of covering current scholarship (last 2 years or so) than APh. Fewer handy abstracts though… Similarly, one can use TOCS-IN. For numismatics specifically, the ANS library actually catalogs the tables of contents of journals and edited volumes they receive, making it an excellent bibliographical resource as well. And, searching the archives of BMCR will often turn up otherwise overlooked material. Digital Library Numis is a useful aggregator of open access Numismatic Publications.

Because I’m a historiographer when I’m not obsessed with coins here are some further links of person interest:  Project on Ancient Cultural Engagement (Polybius and Josesphus and other resources with an admirable interface much like the simpler Vergil Project) For Latin Epigraphy, see Clauss Slaby Database.

Wondering if the original text or a translation exists somewhere out there online?  Sick of hunting?  This guy keeps a near definitive list of online classical texts and translations.  His year by year lists of events are not definitive, but v helpful!

A chronology of Cicero’s writings and his life events (pdf).

A great interactive timeline juxtaposing authors and historical events.

The Archive.org is digitizing many useful things, including high resolution images of the plates of art books in the public domain, like the Wyndham Cook Collection.  And some of the volumes of Grueber’s BMRCC 1910Heidelberg has made its digitized collection of archaeological literature fully text searchable.  For books on numismatics in the public domain, one of the best collections is the “Library” at acsearch.info.

I’m really impressed with sites developed by Nick Molinari and Nicola Sisci to document and solicit feedback on Man-Faced Bull types: Bronze, Silver, and Gold all have their own sites.  I’ve not been through it completely or formed a personal opinion about its merits yet, but definitely of interest to those working on Italian coinages is Luigi Graziano‘s Campaniae Nummis.

For mapping, check out the create your own custom map program at the Ancient World Mapping Center from UNC.   This is a huge powerful program and thus can also feel clunky, but impressive results!  If one is in a mood for maps, this 3D model of Rome and supporting materials are fun.  For the city of Rome in the Augustan and earlier periods the best search able online map is Digital Augustan Rome.

I’ve created this page mostly to organize these links for myself. I’ll add more as and when they seem relevant to my work. I’m not including any standard references that are behind university pay walls. even though I, of course, use those most regularly.

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